May 02

Pay Me Now or Pay Me Later

By Kelly Riggs | Sales + Leadership

In the workplace, managers never have enough time. “I don’t have time” is the most common excuse managers offer up for failing to do the most critical leadership activities – communication, training, development, and planning. It’s not that managers don’t understand they need more time to do those things; they just never seem to have any extra time laying around. However, although managers constantly complain they never have enough of it, it’s amazing to see how poorly they invest what time they do have.

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Apr 25

3 Reasons Customers Don’t Care About Your Product

By Kelly Riggs | Sales + Leadership

The average salesperson is completely enamored with his/her product. That must be fairly obvious to customers, who are consistently inundated with feature-dump, product-focused sales presentations that provide little in the way of differentiation and create even less interest. On the other hand, what you may be missing is there are least three things that your customer cares about WAY more than they care about your product.

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Mar 14

The Sad State of Sales Training

By Kelly Riggs | Sales + Leadership

The vast majority of sales training is incredibly ineffective. Not because much of what is claimed to be “sales” training is actually just “product” training. Not at all. Instead, just looking at actual sales training – that is, training designed to improve selling skills – the evidence is clear. It is enormously ineffective. That’s not only my opinion based on 25 years of observation, it is consistent with extensive research on the effectiveness of salespeople.

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Mar 09

The Unpopular Road to Top Sales Performance

By Kelly Riggs | Sales + Leadership

The truth is that practice is incredibly important to performance. In fact, I would ask you to name one skill of any consequence that does NOT require practice to excel at that skill. Anything? Of course not. You cannot perfect any skill unless, and until, you practice. Which means that your employees are practicing to improve their skills, or YOU (the manager) are guilty of the ultimate performance killer – no practice.

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